5 Quick Low-Carb Snacks

5 Quick Low-Carb Snacks

You don’t have to lose your love affair with food when you go on a low-carb or keto diet and you don’t have to starve. In this post, I share 5 super-quick snacks that are easy to keep stocked in your kitchen and great for keeping your body in a fat-burning state. 

5 Quick Low-Carb Snacks to Speed Weight Loss [Video]

In this video, you’ll learn…

  • Five low-carb snacks that you can enjoy on a low-carb or keto diet.
  • What to do with certain snacks if you’re lactose intolerant.
  • Specific plans on how to succeed with a low carb or keto diet!

Five Easy Low-Carb Snacks

#1 Keto Coffee

If you are a fan of intermittent fasting, but you have trouble getting through the morning hours, you might want to try keto coffee as a low-carb snack.

This style of coffee which contains added fats was first popularized by Dave Asprey, who calls his concoction Bullet-Proof Coffee.

Since then, there have been many variations offered up. You can add any mostly pure fat ingredients such as MCT oil, coconut oil, butter, ghee, heavy cream, or coconut cream.

These ingredients have a long shelf life and, with the help of a handy little 13 dollar milk frother, you get a wonderfully blended keto coffee.

keto coffee as a snack

I mentioned keto coffee as an intermittent fasting aid because, on my second YouTube Channel that I run with my husband, we tested these ingredients in our coffee to see if they would break our fast.

In general, these pure fat foods did not significantly raise our blood glucose or drop our ketones. That allowed our bodies to stay in a fat-burning state.

#2 Eggs

Eggs are the best friend of the low-carb and keto dieter because they are so versatile, nutritious, and easy to keep on hand.

With five grams of fat, six grams of protein, and virtually no carbs, a hard-boiled egg makes a great “tide-me-over” snack to make it to your next meal.

You can eat them every day despite the bad reputation that has haunted eggs for the past few decades. That bad reputation came about because eggs contain cholesterol, but even the last US Dietary Guidelines (2015) stated that “Cholesterol is not a nutrient of concern for overconsumption” (1).

Having said all of that, I know that you can get tired of eating them, so you might want to see my post on 5 Non-Egg, Low-Carb Breakfasts

hard-boiled egg snacks

#3 Bacon

Let’s talk about eggs’ favorite partner, bacon.

Is it okay to eat bacon on a low-carb or keto diet?

Ideally, bacon is at its best when it is uncured and free of nitrates. Curing is a method used to preserve meats. It often involves the addition of sugar or sodium nitrites.

Nitrates (or Nitrites) can cause symptoms like migraines in sensitive individuals (2).

There are also some studies that link nitrates to a higher risk of cancer. This increased risk is mostly because when inside of you, nitrates can be converted to nitrosamine, which is a known carcinogen (3).

Fortunately, antioxidants from vegetables prevent this conversion.

If you’re eating bacon, first look for uncured and nitrate-free. If you cannot find it, you can consume bacon with nitrates if you are eating plenty of vegetables as well.

bacon snack low-carb

#4 Cheese

I was never in love with cheese until I turned my diet low-carb. That may have something to do with how tastes change once your taste buds and brain are no longer being dulled by sugar and carbs. 

If you’re lactose intolerant you still may be able to enjoy certain varieties of cheese. Specifically, you may be able to tolerate higher-fat cheeses, like cheddar, Parmesan, and Swiss.

They are naturally lower in the milk sugar lactose, and the bacteria and acids used in the making of hard cheese help lower the lactose content even further. 

When cheese is allowed to age, there is additional time for the bacteria to act on the lactose. Aged hard cheese may be your best bet if your body has not reacted well to dairy in the past.

high-fat cheese snack

#5 Yogurt

Yogurt is also an easier dairy choice for those who are not particularly dairy tolerant.

The live cultures help break down lactose and those beneficial bacteria act as probiotics that are good for gut health. These live cultures may also help extend the shelf life of yogurt (4).

Most recommendations are to consume yogurt within a week of opening, but I’ve found that a large canister can last double that without issues.

Regular or Greek yogurt is fine, but Greek yogurt is strained during processing, which lowers the lactose content. This makes it a bit better for the lactose intolerant ones among us. 

full-fat yogurt snack

Choosing (& Enjoying) Yogurt

Yogurt makes for a great low-carb snack. To benefit, you want to look for plain, full-fat yogurt with no-sugar-added.

Now admittedly, that can be pretty bland, but you can liven it up with vanilla extract and a pinch of stevia.

To keep it low-carb and high-fat, you can add nuts and seeds and if you can afford a few carbs, a few strawberries and blueberries go a long way to making yogurt enjoyable and keeping your low-carb diet on track.  

How to Succeed on a Low-Carb Diet

These are just five suggestions for ways to stave off hunger and keep your low-carb or keto diet going strong. In my weight loss coaching program, I provide you with an entire list of quick and easy low-carb/high-fat meals and snacks ranging from breakfast to dinner and everywhere in between. Thanks for reading! Have a great week!

Reference: 

(1) “Food and Nutrient Intakes and Health: Current Status and Trends.” Dietary Guidelines 2015, 2015, health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015-binder/meeting7/docs/dgac-meeting-7-sc-1.Pdf.

(2) Millichap, J. Gordon, and Michelle M. Yee. “The diet factor in pediatric and adolescent migraine.” Pediatric neurology 28.1 (2003): 9-15.

(3) Hecht, Stephen S. “Approaches to cancer prevention based on an understanding of N-nitrosamine carcinogenesis.” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 216.2 (1997): 181-191.

(4) Shahani, Khem M., and Ramesh C. Chandan. “Nutritional and healthful aspects of cultured and culture-containing dairy foods.” Journal of Dairy Science 62.10 (1979): 1685-1694.

Author’s Bio:

Dr. Becky Gillaspy, DC graduated in 1991 with a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College. She has worked as an on-air health consultant for a local ABC TV affiliate and spent most of her professional career teaching a range of college courses from Anatomy to Nutrition. She now works full-time helping people reach their health and weight loss goals through her website and YouTube channel.

Some links in the blog post may be affiliate links.

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